Eun

The Culture is a fictional interstellar post-scarcity civilisation or society created by the Scottish writer Iain M. Banks and features in a number of his space opera novels and works of short fiction, collectively called the Culture series. In the series, the Culture is composed primarily of sentient beings of the pan-human variety, artificially intelligent sentient machines, and a small number of other sentient "alien" life forms. Machine intelligences range from human-equivalent drones to hyper-intelligent Minds. The Culture's economy is maintained automatically by its non-sentient machines, with high-level work entrusted to the Minds' subroutines, which allows its humanoid and drone

Gobu-eun, who is based in Gobu-gun, Jeolla-do, was born in 1784 by Eun Kwang-hoon, born in 1754 He was paid in time-departed radish. Eun Kwang-hoon's residence is Yeongyu, Pyongan-do, Pyeongwon-gun.


Eun (恩)Eun (恩) is a surname from Qi. Manchurian Eunwon-ri served as an officer in Cheong Deokjong. It is said that the queen of Baekje's chair king is Eungo in 『Japanese clerk』.


Eun (殷)The 2000 South Korean Census found 15,657 people with this Korean surname. They traced their origins to three different bon-gwan: Yonan County, South Hwanghae and Kangeum, Kumchon County, North Hwanghae in what is today North Korea, and Haengju (행주동), Goyang, Gyeonggi-do in what is today South Korea.


Especially, since the 1970s, a number of given names containing this "Eun" element have been popular for newborn girls in South Korea, including:


In 1930, a national census showed that one family was living in Ssangyong-myeon, Gangseo-gun, South Pyongan.


Eun, also spelled Un, or En, Ehn, Enn, Unn, is an uncommon Korean surname, a single-syllable Korean given name, and an element in many two-syllable Korean given names. As given name meaning differs based on the hanja used to write it. There are 30 hanja with the reading "eun" on the South Korean government's official list of hanja which may be registered for use in given names. The overwhelmingly popular hanja for given name is "恩(grace)" and "銀(silver)".


There are 30 hanja with the reading "Eun" on the South Korean government's official list of hanja which may be used in given names. The meaning differs based on the hanja used to write it.